From: 1/31/2013   To: 2/2/2013

 

 

  

A full booklet of abstracts can be downloaded in pdf format at the bottom of this page.



SCHEDULE


Time

January 31

February 1

February 2

 

 

 

 

7:15-8:45

Registration

 

 

8:45-9:00

Welcome

Late Registration

 

9:00-9:25

Antoine

Khairat

Malleson

9:25-9:50

Sabbahy

Haddow

Thanheiser

9:50-10:15

Norris

Williams

Vartavan

10:15-10:40

Hashesh

Dupras

Cappers

10:40-11:10

Break

Break

Break

11:10-11:35

Dabbs/Zabeki

Lösch

Creasman

11:35-12:00

Wahba

Walker

Lesur

12:00-12:25

Ogunmakin

Saad

El-Dorry

12:30-13:30

Lunch

Lunch

Lunch

13:30-13:55

Merghani

Zakrzewski

Bertini

13:55-14:20

Bianucci

Nerlich

Nasr

14:20-14:45

Gad

Lichtenberg

Wyatt

14:45-15:10

Al-Khafif

Crosby

Hansen

15:10-15:45

Break

Break

Break

15:45-16:10

Baker

Horackova

Sigl

16:10-16:35

Gabr

Pieri

Callou

16:35-17:00

Barta

Rühli

Van Neer

17:00-17:30

Break

Break

Break

17:30-18:00

Keynote: Rose

Poster Session

Redding

18:00-18:30

Keynote: Rose

Poster Session

Strouhal

18:30-19:30

Break

Poster Session

Break

19:30-21:30

Reception

 

Dinner

 


KEY-NOTE LECTURE (31 JANUARY 17.30-18.30)

 

Jerry Rose

(Anthropology Department

University of Arkansas, USA)

 

Bioarchaeology of Ancient Egypt: An Outsider’s Personal Adventures and Opinions of Its Past, Present, and Future

 

A student  not only studies  Egyptology, but is also inducted  into a community  of fellow students, faculty, and scholars. This community is expanded by attending meetings and participating in fieldwork. The budding scholar not only grows in knowledge, but is socialized into a scholarly culture with its own attitudes and perspectives. When a researcher who has spent a career working in another geographic area decides to enter the Egyptology community some might say “who is this person and what are they doing here?” I describe my personal adventures in Egypt and my interactions with the community of Egyptologists and Bioarchaeologists over the past 24 years. I point out how participation in meetings, fieldwork, and skeletal analyses has possibly shaped my views of this field differently from those who participated  from the time they were students. I certainly had to learn how I conducted myself in my research. I discuss the separate research paths of mummy and skeletal studies, the overwhelming influence of the various dam projects, and  the transformations of the “Egyptian Antiquities Service” over the past 150 years have all had on the development  of bioarchaeology in Egypt. It appears to me that the future of bioarchaeology in Egypt has great promise with the development of new methods, such as ancient DNA analysis, in addition to the development  of new  theoretical  perspectives, but it will continue to be hampered by the scarcity of comparative skeletal collections and the absence of uniform data recording.